DIY Reversible Coffee Sleeve

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In case you’re wondering if it’s a good idea to drink coffee anytime after 4 p.m., the answer is no.  It’s not a good idea.

Even if you have a test the next day and plan on spending the whole night studying (and don’t), maybe just fight the sleeping pains, and don’t drink coffee.

Or you’ll be writing on your blog at midnight when you still have to pack for vacation.

Uhhhhh.

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Anyways, I made these for my friends for a “Merry Late-mas” gift.  That’s when it’s February and you still haven’t given your friends their gifts.

Or something.

They were super simple to make, and I think they turned out pretty cute.  I actually like to put them around my coffee mugs at home as opposed to actual disposable coffee cups.  1. Because I always forget it when I go to a coffee shop, and 2. Because I’m one of those weird people that grabs the actual coffee mug and not the handle.

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Coffee places are actually one of my favorite places in the whole entire world.  You can catch me at a coffee house at least twice a week, maybe even more.  At one point, I went to my favorite place five times in one week.

It’s not something that I’m proud of, but I have to accept my flaws.

Also, as many of you know, I plan to open a coffee shop after I graduate from college.  So really, my nonsensical coffee obsession is all in the name of research.

My favorite place to research is called The Hub, and it’s a local place here in Reno.  They roast their own coffee beans, and their coffee actually saved my life.

They’re the kind of coffee place that make you realize the reason that Starbuck’s puts so much sugar in their coffee is to mask the taste of their sub-par coffee.

Sorry Starbuck’s.  It’s nothing personal really.  I still hit you up sometimes when I have a giftcard or something.

Anyways, back to The Hub.  If you’re ever in Reno, it’s a must stop.  I prefer their location on Riverside (by the Truckee River…amazing!) but they also have a location on Cheney, which is the OG Hub.  Order a pour-over (my favorite) or a latte (my second favorite) and you’ll be the happiest ever.

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I really love their logo, which is why there’s so many pictures of it on here.  Also, I have to show some coffee shop love for all the time they let me spend there studying.

P.S. These photos were not taken in The Hub.  Partially because I didn’t have my camera when I went to there on Tuesday, and partially because sometimes I just don’t want to be “that girl taking pictures of her food” in public.  I like to keep my food picture-taking a private affair.

But I did do my best to make my house kind of look like a coffee shop.  Which really isn’t too hard, because it already kind of looks like a coffee shop.  I mean, we have a Chemex, an Aeropress, a coffee grinder, the scale, the mugs…all we’re missing is the espresso machine (we’re taking donations).  (6.11.15 Update: We now have an espresso machine…)

Plus, when I was setting up my coffee table for the pictures, I realized that my Fleetwood Mac “Rumours” album was the perfect accessory.  My favorite coffee + one of my favorite albums ever = very happy Sara.

Unfortunately, I’m still trying to figure out my camera, so many of the pictures came out blurry 🙁  Boo.  Hopefully when I visit my family this weekend, my brother can help me figure it all out.

Alright, sorry for talking so much.  Here’s how to make these:

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Materials:

2 different fabrics (about 1/4 yard each to be safe)

1/4 yd. iron on adhesive fabric (I got the medium kind for insulation)

Elastic

Button

Thread, needle, sewing machine, etc.

Begin by taking a coffee sleeve from your favorite coffee shop.  Trace it onto some printer paper, and cut out.  (These were the blurry pics, so I didn’t post this step.  It’s pretty simple, really).

Trace the shape on to your two different fabrics and your adhesive fabric.

Iron the adhesive fabric onto the wrong side of one of your fabrics.  Lay your two fabrics good sides together.

Cut a two inch piece of elastic, fold, and place between the fabrics so a little bit is peeking out.

Sew around, the sleeve, making sure to back stitch over the elastic to ensure it stays in place.  Make sure to leave a two inch gap.

Flip the sleeve inside out.  Fold the seam in around the two inch gap, and top seam around the whole sleeve.

Fold the sleeve around a coffee cup, and mark where the elastic should meet the button.  Hand sew the button in place.

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These are the ones I made for my friends.

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And if you want, you can flip it inside out and make it reversible.  Or you could sew a button on the other side if you feel so inclined.

(I did not).

(But I may in the future).

Goodnight beautiful people.

SerendipitybySaraSig

*Song of the Day: Never Going Back Again–Fleetwood Mac*
(obviously)

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DIY Wire Headbands

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Do you love American Apparel?

*raises hand*

Do you cry every time they ring up your total?

*sob* *raises hand*

American Apparel is one of my most favorite stores in the whole world.  I bought two dresses last time I shopped there.  I don’t have anywhere to wear these dresses (I wear them all the time actually.  Better overdressed than underdressed or something like that).  I think I had the whole “I’ll wear this on a date!” idea in my head.  Until, you know, I didn’t go on any dates.

I have a whole point to this guys.  I saw these wire headbands at American Apparel (when I was buying said dresses).  I fell in love with them.  Especially a white one with black polka dots.  It spoke to me.

But the price did not.  Maybe if I only wanted to buy 1.  But I wanted to buy all the prints.

And then I realized how incredibly easy they would be to make!  Please keep in mind: I am no advanced sew-er.

(I was going to write “sewer” until I realized that made it seem like I was a dark underground tunnel full of waste and then I got sad.  When I say “sew-er”, I mean somebody that sews.)

(In case you couldn’t figure that out.)

To hand sew mine, it took an hour.  It would probably take half that time with a sewing machine.  Which I have.  Which is in the back of my closet.  Which may or may not work depending on the day (and how the user handles the situation).

So I opted to hand sew.  It’s up to you.

Materials:

1/4 yard of fabric–I recommend cotton or something easy to sew!

Matching thread

Needle or sewing machine

Tape measure

Pencil or white colored pencil

22 gauge (floral) wire

Scissors

Jewelry pliers (optional)

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Got it?!  Good!  You’re ready to go.

First, begin by measuring and cutting fabric.  Measure it at least 32 inches long and about 4 inches wide for a 2 inch wide headband.  It may be a little under 2 inches for seam allowance.  If you’re dead set on the final headband being 2 inches wide, make it about 4.5 inches wide at first.

 NOW BE SMART UNLIKE ME.  Keep it one piece and fold it over so you only have to sew up one side.  I was dumb.  I cut it in half.  I had to sew up two sides.  DON’T DO THAT GUYS.

Just fold the fabric in half so that the good sides of the fabric are touching (you know it’s the good side if it’s the pretty side.  If it looks faded, it’s the bad side.  Hard to tell with black!).  Make sure to fold it hotdog style.

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Now measure your wire about two inches longer than your fabric.  Twist each side into a loop.  You can use pliers or your fingers.  I used my fingers which is a little pokey, but you could probably live through it.  Make sure there are no sharp points on the wire that could pierce through your skeleton and into your brain.

Wow, sorry.

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Cut each side into this shape, at an angle.  You don’t really have to do it, but it looks better.  I traced one side with a white colored pencil, cut it out, and then used the scraps to trace the other end and cut it out.  Make sense?

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Sew it up!  But not all the way guys.  Just chill.

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Sew it until there are about two inches left in the middle.  Make sure it’s the middle so that when you finish sewing it up, the stitches are less noticeable.

Then flip it the right side out.  Just push the fabric through the middle hole and use a chop stick or your fingers to get it all the way through.  It’ll work.  I promise.  It might just take a few minutes.

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Put the wire through the hole in the center.  Bend it around so that the loops are at the end points.

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Stitch up the hole in the center.

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At this point, you’re going to want to find the loops through the fabric.  Then make a little stitch inside the loop so that the wire doesn’t move around to the middle of the headband.  This is optional, but very helpful.  If you use a matching thread, you won’t even notice the little stitch!

Then just twist is around your head!

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You can twist the little end points into a knot…

*queue sultry look apparently*

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…Or put the endpoints under your hair so that it’s flat on top…

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…or wear it Matilda style!  Which is my fave.

Reasons why these headbands rock:

1. They can be manipulated into many different styles.

2. They’re easy and you can pick your own fabrics.

3. They actually stay in place all day.

4.  The best reason.  No headache!  They don’t squeeze your noggin.  It’s a frickin miracle!

Let me know what you think of these you guys.  If you have questions, please ask.  Sometimes it can be difficult to explain these things over a blog!

XO Sara